Skip to main content

About your Search

20121202
20121210
STATION
MSNBCW 27
CNNW 22
CSPAN2 14
MSNBC 10
KQED (PBS) 7
CNN 6
CSPAN 6
KRCB (PBS) 4
KQEH (PBS) 3
KCSM (PBS) 2
KTVU (FOX) 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 154
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 156 (some duplicates have been removed)
to develop north korea's economy. >> translator: we must start on a path of industrial revolution for the new century to make north korea a great economic power. >> reporter: but there are no tangible signs of improvement. the u.n. world food program says 16 million north koreans, or nearly 70% of the population, suffer from malnutrition. north korea's relations with the outside world are at a standstill. last february the united states agreed to provide food aid in exchange for a freeze on ballistic missile tests. but the deal was broken after the north tested a missile in april. north korea's leadership has been trying to hold direct talks with the united states, but officials in washington said they are not ready to accept. china is also applying pressure on its neighbor. arguing that the missile launch would violate u.n. resolutions. >>> several japanese ships have headed to southwestern japan to get ready for the launch. they're carrying intercepter missiles. a maritime self-defense force vessel arrived at ishiyaki equipped with surface to air missiles. the flight path could take it over
is for the president if the economy slips into a recession. we are talking about 2013 having no growth. >> it would be horrible. >> yeah. so it's a little hard to see what the game is. as kim was mentioning, the president wants these tax increases. it seems to me we will go through this sort of scorpion dance the rest of the year. what did the president campaign on? what was the one thing i think most people would say that he campaigned on? that was raising tax rates on the wealthiest, the two top rates. that's the thing that i think is on the table. and the -- >> but the republicans put that on the table. >> the republicans have put that on the table. >> at least through deductions. debate the rates or deductions. but they are willing to put it on the table. the question is what do the president give the republicans in return, if anything? >> i think that's what the republican position should be. say we have committed to what you campaigned on. if you are not willing to talk about reducing spending, then we aren't going to be able to do a deal with you, and i think that puts the political onus to
've had time to you think the country's economy will improve? 51% say it will improve. economic well being of the middle class -- catch up with my slides. there we go. the deficit and debt will improve as 34%. but the one thing they are certain is that taxes will increase. and in the next four years how it affected you think the federal government will be on each of the following issues. we read a list of these issues, we rotated those. this is how it basically stacks up. ensuring long-term future of entire programs such as social security and medicare, 65%. 64% creating jobs, 64% improving public education, growing the economy, creating a business environment that allows for innovation. lowering the federal deficit actually false down to 40. not as much confidence there as a part on the other side. we been said the training faces a number of challenges including but not limited to large budget deficits, national debt, slower economic recovery, high unemployment, deep political divide on many issues. do you believe we will overcome these challenges in the foreseeable future as we've done i
and reach an agreement that's going to be good for the country and for the economy. >> then what now? with democratic senator mark warner and kelli ayote. benghazi and obama's second term. with montana governor brian schweitzer, and former hewlett-packard ceo carly fiorina. and susan page of usa today. i am candy crowley. and this is "state of the union." republicans call the fiscal cliff plan a joke, an insult and break from reality. suffice it to say, it is unacceptable to them. the president's opening round offer includes $1.6 trillion in new taxes, $400 billion in savings from medicare and other entitlement programs, $50 billion in new stimulus spending, and an additional $285 billion to fund depreciation and mortgage programs, unemployment insurance benefits, and payroll tax cuts. >> this extra spending, that's actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it's -- it was not a serious proposal. >> while his aides were on capitol hill offering up the opening bid, the president was making his case in pennsylvania campaign style. >> at the end of the day a clear
need liken fraught structure. we think that's what is good for the economy. if they have different suggestions and want to go further in some areas, they should lay it out to us. >> you say they are in a hard spot, what do you mean? >> they are trying to figure out how to find a way to support things that they know they are going to have to do that will be very hard for them. you've heard them for the first time in two decades now acknowledge that they are willing to have revenues go up as part of the balanced plan. that's a it good first step but they have to tell us what they are willing to do on rates and revenues. and they have to tell us on the spending side if they want to go beyond where we are or do it differently and they have to tell us what makes sense to them. what we can't do, chris; try to figure out what works for them. >> the president campaigned for re-election on the idea of a, quote, balanced approach, end quote, to deficit reduction. a mixture of tax increases and spending cuts. here's the plan that the republicans say you presented to them this week. >> i can t
referred to things that will help make the economy stronger in the short-term and let me explain why we proposed that. what we are suggesting is that we work to rebuild the country's infrastructure, rather than putting it off, doesn't say just to put it off and extend unemployment insurance benefits and help make it easier for americans to refinance mortgages and, tax incentives for business investment and proposed how to do that in a fiscally responsible way we can afford to pay for and matched those proposals, with spending savings that, together as part of the plan, get us down to the point where we stabilize our debt and that is the critical test. >> chris: let me drill down into the spending part of the equation, here they're increases, spending increase as you are proposing. $150 billion, in stimulus, public works projects over several years. a $30 billion extension of unemployment insurance, for one year. extension of payroll tax cuts, mortgage relief, deferral, of automatic cuts for doctors and medicare. here are the spending cuts. unspecified savings from nonentitlement program
there's no progress. >> the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. it's time for the president, if he's serious to come back to us with a counter offer. >> the president told a virginia family on thursday he won't back down on taxing the rich. >> just to be clear, i'm not going to sign any package that somehow prevents the top rate from going up for folks at the top 2%. but i do remain optimistic that we can get something done that is good for families like this one. >> the rebels gain on assad raising fears he might use chemical weapons. that was enough to frighten the russians into talking with hillary clinton about a political transition. >> the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process re -- result in a unified democratic syria in which all citizens are represented. the future of this kind cannot possibly include assad. >> a tragic turn of events in london. the nurse that first transferred that prank call to duchess catherine is found dead. david axelrod shaves it all off
to protect the top 2%. better to take the hit now, they argued, than in january with the world economy in turmoil and second recession coming. number two, john boehner, the speaker is claiming he's met obama's demand for higher taxes for the rich. that's good. he agreed in principle the rich must pay more. number three, there's talk for the republican leaders that they could vote to continue the tax cuts for the 98% now and therefore avoid the fiscal cliff and put off for now the top 2%. and the question then, let the debt ceiling not take effect. a tax cut delayed i argue is a tax cut avoided. joining me with the republican defense highly tauted fan of the eagles, ed rendell and alex wagner of msnbc's "now." governor, i want you to read what's going on here. first speaker boehner defended the gop's tax proposal saying it does take a bite out of the rich but president obama held firm to tax rate hike on the wealthiest. let's listen to the back and forth. >> revenues we're putting on the table are going to come from, guess who? the rich. there are ways to limit deductions, close loophol
to these good people about the fiscal cliff. think of the economy as the car and the rich man as the driver. if you don't give the driver all the money, he'll drive you over a cliff. it's just commonsense. >> finally someone on the right willing to tell the truth. but here's the thing. this time it doesn't matter if mr. burns, speaker boehner, or the tea party try to hold the american people hostage just to get what they want. the president isn't going to budge. >> so i want to send a very clear message to people here. we are not going to play that game next year. >> up until now, the gop has ln playing with a load of debt but today president obama has the trump card. joining me now is congresswoman janet can kakowski, member of the progressive caucus and mar sdwree omera, democratic strategist. thank you both for coming on the show tonight. congresswoman, let me start with you. is the gop serious about holding the economy hostage again just to get what they want? >> well, think about the cards that they are holding. they are in favor of tax cuts for the rich. they want to cut tax care prog
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> woodruff: the economy added more jobs than expected in november, and the unemployment rate dropped to a four year low. good evening, i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the "newshour" tonight, paul solman breaks down the latest report. and we debate the benefits of extending unemployment insurance amid washington's fiscal uncertainty. >> woodruff: then we turn to the supreme court which agreed today to take up the issue of gay marriage. margaret warner looks at what's at stake with marcia coyle of "the national law journal." >> brown: hari sreenivasan reports on the threat to the shellfish industry from coast to coast, as ocean temperatures rise and the waters are more acidic. >> this is a very dramatic change that has not been seen in the worlds oceans for more than 50 million years. >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and gwen ifill sits down with michael beschloss, whose recent foray into the twitter-verse has opened up a new way to view history in the digital age
enviable numbers out of china. chinese government economists there say they do expect their economy will grow this year by less than 8%, though. it would be the first time in 13 years that it's dropped below that mark. the government targeted growth of 7.5%. a representative of the chinese academy of social sciences said the economy would grow 7.7%. >> translator: china's exports are slowing because of the european debt crisis and the global economic slowdown. >> he said the economy bottomed out in the july-to-september quarter, but consumption as well as industrial output improved in september and october. he's predicting growth will rebound next year to about 8.2%. he said increased public investment and more monetary easing would spur the economy. but li called for flexible government policies if the situation in europe gets any worse. >>> a report sponsored by the u.s. government says that shipping surplus shale gas overseas will benefit the country's economy. this could pave the way for getting government permission to export the commodity. the u.s. energy department released t
for regional power. israel has the most powerful economy and military, but lacks political power for obvious reasons. turkey has economic and military power, but it also has growing regional clout. egypt is the natural leader of the arab world but it's not in a position to dominate. its economy is shambles, its military is second rate. the public opposition has been reassuring. the middle east is a complex region that is changing fast. grand generalizations about it are likely to be undone by events. but it is a more vibrant, energetic, open, even democratic place than the middle east a generation ago. for more, read my column in this week's "time" magazine. let's get started. >>> it was a week filled with tension and violence in egypt. there were mass protests after morsi issued a decree neutering the judiciary. there were demonstrations in his favor, and a constitution was drafted that spurred protest on the street. what to make of it all? two of my favorite scholars are with me. welcome, guys. conventional wisdom is this is a power grab by morsi. is that accurate? >> his dclaration gave h
of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republican line, from maine. caller: i thank unemployment is probably a good thing, but when you expanded too far, it put a really heavy burden on the employers. as one lady called in on the last segment, the state she was from is obviously much higher than made is, but when it gets to a point that your state system goes broke, they put fees on the employer, and they cannot afford to pay the rates. host: mr. tanner? guest: the unemployment tax is generally under 1% even when you include the match that goes into the extended benefits. we're already running in federal debt more than 100% of gdp. once you get over 60% to 70% of gdp, that begins to slow economic growth. we are costing jobs. that is because that money is -- players are looking down the road and saying they're going to have to pay more in the future. we simply cannot afford to spend money, especially we do not have, and still e
than to stay in. won people drop out of the labor force they slow the economy. their productivity is gone, their contributions are no longer there, so this is a different situation we're facing today than we faced i really think since the end of the world war ii. >> brown: before the implication of the fiscal cliff,xplain it because different states have different impact. >> under normal economic times this say program that is governed by state law and administered by the state. and states pay up to 26 weeks of benefits, six months for people who lost jobs through no fault of their own. but if bad economic times historically congress has authorized additional levels of benefits. this time it is a program called the emergency unemployment compensation system. and there are four different tiers depending on how bad your state unemployment rate is every state gets 14 weeks. nine states get up to 47 a decisional weeks. and the rest are in betweenment but you have to be over 9% to get that additional 47 weeks. >> brown: so it is this program that is now caught up in the fiscal cliff ne
over the last four years, there is progress in some key sectors of our economy. we've seen housing finally begin to bounce back for the first time, and that obviously has an enormous ripple affect throughout the economy. consumer confidence is as high as it's been. many of you over the last two, three years have experienced record profits or near record profits and have a lot of money where you're prepared to invest in plants, and equipment, and hire folks. obviously globally the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time. asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago. but i think what all of you recognize and many of you have told me is that everybody is looking to america, because they understand that if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that is broad based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globe balance leave. globally and i think we can get the
is going to take a more, i would say rational approach to how to deal with their own economy and how they deal with their own people, and how they deal internationally. and so i think generally there's been a feeling that there might be some hope there. however, now we are approaching, once again, a potential violation of a u.n. security council resolution, and we encourage the leadership in north korea to consider what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the
to do or turn back the clock and return to the politics of old. >> translator: i will bring the economy out of deflation, correct the high yen, lead economic growth, enrich people's lives, and recover an economy where young people don't have to worry about finding jobs. i'll strengthen social security and will promote the reconstruction of the disaster-hit northeast. we'll aim to take back power by winning a majority along with the new komeito party. >> candidates from the following parties are also running -- tomorrow party, new komeito, restoration party, japanese communist party, your party, social democratic party. new party daichi, people's new party, new party nippon, and new renaissance party. candidates are trying to win one of the 480 seats in the lower house. there are 300 single-seat districts. parties win a number of the other 180 seats depending on how much of the proportional representation vote they capture. 1,294 candidates filed to run in the single-seat constituencies. and 1,001 candidates are running for seats in the proportional representation system. they'll share t
like republicans want? >> here is what is at stake. economy is on the brink potentially of going to recession. that will have the worst impact on the deficit that anything will. we got to make sure that the economy continuebes to grow. that is the problem here. i know democrats have this blood lust to raise taxes on supposedly rich people, which are really small business people. but it is not going to do anything to grow the economy. here is what president obama needs. he has to make sure the economy grows. he will be a two-term jimmy carter if the economy goes back in recession and we can't pull ourselves out of this thing. >> eric: i heard you laugh, martin on the "two-term jimmy carter" line. >> he doesn't want to be a two-term george w. bush that took us in a steep recession. >> hey, you are the one with the bush tax cut. >> this can be worked out. everybody knows that. you can raise rates a point or two, that is not going to be end of the world. republicans understand that. let's get through with the fear we have had a couple of weeks of theater and let's get down to serious
? >> i think we'll get a deal. everyone realizes how important it is, our economy is moving up some, not fast enough but some, and to go over the cliff would be terrible. i think we'll get an agreement. the reason i think we'll get an agreement, what's standing in the way is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39.6 but we're seeing real progress in that regard in two ways. first, a good number of republican conservatives, people like colter and crystal, said we have to do it. last week tom coburn said it's preferable, cutting deductions and business leaders who support mitt romney, the head of fedex and at&t saying let it happen. the president won the election on that issue and i think you will see our republican colleagues reluctantly say 39.6. >> let me interrupt and bring in senator corker. senator schumer's right, a growing number much republicans and conservatives, not a majority, but a growing number, are saying we have to cave on tax -- on raising tax rates, not just the idea of closing loopholes. would you accept returning to the clinton rate of 39.6% or wou
.7%. the economy added 146,000 jobs, not great but good. a third of that came from the retail sector. 53,000 jobs added. professional and business services up 43,000. leisure and hospitality up. construction, though, lost 20,000 jobs. we should note that jobs numbers were revise d downward, though, for september and october. in september it was revised from 148,000 gain to 238,000. went from 138,000 to 132,000. this month, the 7.7 is a full point lower than where we were at this time last year. so what are we supposed to make of these numbers and does the november report provide us a real sense of where this recovery is right now? let's bring in the man we like to bring in every month, the chief economist for moody's analytics. mark, i have to start with this sandy impact. the labor department specifically put out a statement saying our survey response rates and the affects ee eed states. it did not affect estimates for november. do you believe that? >> i'm skeptical. i mean, new yorkers worked really hard and got it together gracefully given the circumstances. i suspect when we get all the data
the kinds of revenue from the wealthiest americans to help the economy grow and achieve deficit reduction and this puts us on a path towards a better economy. >> [inaudible question] what will he do at this moment? >> i would simply redirect that question to the republican leaders, who to this day, have not put forward any proposal on how they would achieve revenues and address the issue on the top 2%. there is no other way to do it, there is no other mathematically sound way to do it. making vague promises about achieving revenue through capping deductions were closing loopholes, it simply doesn't add up to a serious proposal. we haven't heard which deductions they would cap or which loopholes they were close. what is true is that other proposals that have been put forward include attempts to raise revenue only through closing loopholes and limited deductions can only achieve this if the middle class gets stuck with the bill. or if you have a proposal that is wildly limply unfeasible because it suggests that we would wipe out charitable deductions. it is simply impossible and getting som
: without affordable energy we have no economy and that is for sure bad for my children. we have no jobs. we have no industry. >> why is the fastest growing new source of energy in this country wind energy or distributed solar. melissa: because it is completely supported by the government and by my tax dollars. >> not even close to as much as --. melissa: absolutely no money to spend on these things you know what -- >> actually big oil, gas and coal are actually much more heavily subsidized. melissa: you and disagree what is subsidy is. that is fine for debate for another time. we agree to disagree. do you know crayons, made from petroleum. >> right. maybe that is essential use in your view. we don't need to drive our cars with petroleum. we can use --. melissa: we do, because i don't want to pay $59 a gallon for biofuel. >> we need to use government and our taxpayer dollars wisely. melissa: i do too. >> make sure we use technology that actually doesn't exacerbate climate change and actually --. melissa: electricity comes from coal and nuclear? you like coal and nuclear. >> also comes from s
are willing to make sure we don't go over this fiscal cliff but at the same time don't harm this economy. what has to happen here if the president shows a little leadership we are willing to stay in the room and stay here and we are willing to get this done. that's why you saw a proposal that is raoeubl reasonable that meets his criteria. >> reporter: steny hoyer said in the next few days we will see substantive movement in private to get this done. jenna: we'll continue to watch the play-by-play, mike, thank you. jon: right now we are continuing to await a speech by former president george w. bush, the speakers are taking to the podium there to get ready to introduce the former president. he is set to address a conference there in dallas, where he will spotlight the positive impact of immigration on u.s. economic growth. this as the g.o.p. looks to attract more hiss to the party. meantime mr. bush's father, former president george h.w. bush is spending another day in the hospital being treated for bronchitis and a lingering cough. we told you about that last week when we first found out that
about is 350,000 americans in this report alone. a really staggering the state of our economy now. here's a bit more for the labor report. 12 million americans still unemployed. about 40% of them have been out of work for 27 weeks or longer. more than eight million americans only working part time due to the current state of the economy. martha: new comments about the crisis in syria coming from secretary of state hillary clinton. the u.s. and other nations fear that the syrian regime could use chemical weapons against its own people. secretary clinton making it very clear that syrian president bashar al-assad must go. >> let me also be absolutely clear. the united states stands with the syrian people in insisting that any transition process result in a unified, democratic syria. in which all citizens are represented. sunni, alawite, christians, kurds, men, women, every syrian must be included in this process for a new and better future. martha: still far from where we are right now in the country of syria where 45,000 people have been killed under the assad regime. president, secretary
has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: neither side showed signs of budging today as the nation edged closer toward a so- called fiscal cliff that could raise taxes by year's end. we begin with a report from newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top two percent go up. we're not going to be able to get a deal without it. >> reporter: in his first interview since the election, president obama rejected a proposal from house speaker john boehner. he spoke on bloomberg television. >> unfortunately the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. i'm happy to entertain other ideas that the
for the economies in our states, as you're thinking about other changes, whether it's in the tax code or whether it's in cuts, if states are affected, we ought to have a seat at the table. that was really our message to all three. we said at the outset we're not embracing one plan or the other. i believe that they clearly want to get it done and we're hopeful that they will. it's important that they get it done soon. >> right. governor herbert, they've got to get it done because if they don't get it done, then it's going to rebound badly on your party more than the democrats because all the polls say that two-thirds of americans would blame the republicans for not getting this done, which may or may not be fair, but that's politics and that's reality. now, the sticking point on your side seems to be look, we don't want to have a plan that we sign up to that means 2% of the wealthiest americans have to pay more tax and certainly not without the kind of spending cuts we're looking for. but america doesn't agree with that, either. america, two-thirds of all people polled say they're quite happy for th
are the impediments to that? we have an economy that aren't creating enough of those middle-class jobs and we don't have enough people with skills to do those jobs and there are a lot of people that fall into those categories. access to education and the impediments i faced in my own life to education and how impossible it would have been for us to go to college if there weren't pell grants and student loans. it's the social realities and social changes that have occurred. you can't separate economic well-being from their social well-being. there are many young kids in america that are growing up in difficult circumstances raised by heroic parent, a grandmother in substandard housing, poor nutrition and schools that are failing. those kids are going to struggle. they don't go to after-school activities because the paints can't afford the fees. can you succeed? there are parents out there doing amazing things and will be the first ones to tell you, it is hard, but we can't be the country we need to be if we don't address that. government can have a role but civil society has a bigger role and we s
think everyone realizes how important it is. our economy is moving up some, not fast enough but, some, and to go over the cliff would be terrible. i think we will get an agreement. and, the reason i think we'll get an agreement, what is standing in the way, is revenues, particularly making that top rate go up to 39-6 but i think we are seeing real progress in that regard in two days. first, a good number of republican conservatives, people like coulter and bill kristol said we have to do it and, tom coburn says, in terms of the deduction and, mitt romney and the republicans and head of fedex and at&t saying, let it happen. so i think that is likely to happen. the president won the election on that issue and i think you'll see our republican colleagues reluctantly say, okay. let's go up to 39.6. >> chris: senator, let me interrupt right there and bring in senator corker. senator schumer is exactly right. a growing number of republicans and conservative, not a majority but a growing number are saying, look, we have to cave on tax -- raising tax rates, not just the idea of closing loopho
, there is progress in some key sectors of our economy. we've seen housing finally begin to bounce back for the first time and that has an enormous ripple effect throughout the economy. consumer confidence is as high as it's been. many of you over the last two or three years have experienced record profits or near record profits and have a lot of money in plants and equipment and hire folks. obviously globally, the economy is still soft. europe is going to be in the doldrums for quite some time, asia is not charging forward and some of the emerging markets are not charging forward as quickly as they were maybe a few years ago, but i think all of you recognized and many of you told me is that everybody's looking to america, because they understand if we're able to put forward a long-term agenda for growth and prosperity that's broad-based here in the united states, that confidence will not just increase here in the united states, it will increase globally and we can get the virtuous cycle that i think all of us have been waiting for and want to see. what's holding us back right now ironically is a lot
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 156 (some duplicates have been removed)